Two Old Codgers

How the World strikes us

WORDS
Words come in and out of fashion. Some of them drive you potty and what's worse you find that you are using them. 'Absolutely' seems to be the word of the year. 'So' is the TV presenters choice for the starting word for most sentences and how many times do you hear 'sort of'? There are lots more but I absolutely must sort of start on the blog. So, let's get on.

The 20-volume Oxford English Dictionary contains entries for 171,476 words in current use, and
Dictionary
47,156 obsolete words. We know new words are added to the dictionary but old words don't get dropped. It means that 16th century 'goodbye' rubs shoulders with the 2006 'google'.

Some of the archaic entries in the Oxford English dictionary could be very useful today. Here is a short passage I wrote for this blog:

Been feeling a bit wabbit this morning, I've been sitting here so long trying to think of something to write for the blog that I have the croochie-proochles. I had a couple of glasses of wine last night and feel quite crapulent. I've been casually moving things round on the computer desk and everything is in a huckmuck.

The problem is, I start to tell Bill my ideas and he tells me I'm turning into a
blatherskite. My response is to tell him he's becoming a doryphore he should stop scratching his oxter and hang up the phone. Anyway, I must stop futzing around lollygagging, hunting and pecking and try to make progress. The problem is some people are saying the blogs have become sesquipedalian. Mind you that's only the shavetails and they are a stercoraceous bunch.


I'll save you trouble of looking up the unusual words:
wabbit means Exhausted or slightly unwell. "I'm feeling a bit wabbit"
croochie-proochles
means A feeling of discomfort from being seated in an uncomfortable position
crapulent
means Suffering from excessive eating or drinking
huckmuck
means The confusion that comes from things not being in their right place
blatherskite
means A person who talks at great length without making much sense
doryphore
means A pedantic and annoyingly persistent critic
oxter (No! not that) It
means armpit)
futzing
means To waste time or effort on frivolities
lollygagging
means To fool around and waste time
hunting and pecking
means Typing by looking for characters on the keyboard individually
sesquipedalian
means Given to the use of long words
shavetails
means An inexperienced person
stercoraceous
means Consisting of, resembling or pertaining to faeces

Shame these and others aren't used, some of them are
very useful words and have a ring to them.


Chicken First


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